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The quiet organization - why a common language does not always create a linguistic community

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dc.contributor.author Tange, Hanne
dc.date.accessioned 2020-01-24T10:20:05Z
dc.date.available 2020-01-24T10:20:05Z
dc.date.issued 2009
dc.identifier.other DOI: https://doi.org/10.7146/law.v4i6.6188
dc.identifier.uri https://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12528/1407
dc.description.abstract Imagine an office environment in an international company in Denmark. Around you employees are going about their daily routines. They write e-mails while chatting to their neighbours, exchange a few comments on their way to the photocopier, and gather in the break to discuss their boss, holiday plans or news on a joint project. Try then to imagine the same space, only without the noise: A work environment where employees perform their duties quietly and most of the chit-chat has disappeared. This is the situation in many organizations that have adopted English as their corporate language. en
dc.language.iso en_US en
dc.subject corporate language en
dc.subject use of language en
dc.subject communication en
dc.title The quiet organization - why a common language does not always create a linguistic community en


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