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The role of high prestige languages in the formation of European literary language

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dc.contributor.author Lewaszkiewicz, Tadeusz
dc.date.accessioned 2017-03-27T11:25:26Z
dc.date.available 2017-03-27T11:25:26Z
dc.date.issued 2017
dc.identifier.uri https://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12528/48
dc.description.abstract I believe that contacts between popular dialects and high culture languages (mainly Latin and Greek) were the main factor driving the increase of language efficiency in the early period of forming literary languages of the European cultural area. Vernacular language patterns did not prompt developments in vocabulary, syntax and style until much later. Once intellectualized, dialects served as a tool for transmitting Greek and Latin culture, as well as logical and abstract thought. A purely popular language was unable to fulfill this function. en_US
dc.subject bilingwizm pl
dc.subject wielojęzyczność pl
dc.subject historia języka pl
dc.subject interferencja pl
dc.subject język literacki pl
dc.subject kontakty językowe pl
dc.subject bilingualism en_US
dc.subject multilingualism en_US
dc.subject language history en_US
dc.subject interference en_US
dc.subject literary language en_US
dc.subject language contacts en_US
dc.title The role of high prestige languages in the formation of European literary language en_US
dc.type Article en_US


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